Do Something Else

When my pastor first approached me about stepping back into ministry, he caught me off guard. My history as a worship leader and media director had preceded me, and I fully expected to the conversation to head in that direction. I wish I could remember the exact specifics, but it was along these lines:

I was wondering if you would consider praying about stepping into ministry…

…as an usher. I think that it would be a great opportunity for you to serve while getting to know and love people in our church. And “I’d rather be a doorkeeper in the house of my God…”

…oh, and if you wanted to pray about leading worship occasionally, that’s fine too…

…but really seek the Lord about ushering. I think that it would be a good fit.

I cringed inside.

I am emphatically not a social person. There was a time where I made sure I was 10 minutes late for church every week to guarantee that I would miss the “turn and greet” segment of the service. I’ve always been drawn to ministries that isolate. As a worship leader, was either on stage or back stage. As a media director, I was well hidden in tech booths.

We all know the often quoted passage:

…not neglecting to meet together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another, and all the more as you see the Day drawing near.

Seems like I had managed to completely neglect the “meeting together” aspect of my faith, despite being front and center in the church.

I knew he was right; if I was going to minister at the church, I needed to love the people in the church. After loving God, this is the second greatest commandment. What do you do when you love someone? You interact with them, you get to know them, you be a part of their life. It’s hard to do that when you’re separated by a physical wall.

After praying about it, I let him know to put me on the usher schedule.

I’ll be honest, I still get nervous in the days leading up to my scheduled weeks, but I think this role has been one of the most fruitful areas I have ever served in; it never fails that I leave those services more encourage than any other time.

Here’s what I would encourage you to do; take one service a month to serve in another boots-on-the-ground, face to face with people ministry. Serve as an usher or help at the info table; take orders at the coffee bar or help with children’s ministry check in. Get to know people in your church, love them, be a part of their lives.

Why is this important?

Trustworthiness: If a stranger walked up to you and asked you to follow them, would you do it? Okay, some of you might depending on the circumstances, but most wouldn’t. Every Sunday, you’re asking people to follow you as you lead them in worship. Have you given the people you’re leading a reason to trust that you’re not going to lead them the wrong direction? If you don’t give anyone an opportunity to know you, it’s going to be hard to earn any trust.

Humility: The unspoken reality of most of us worship leaders is that we all could be taken down a couple of notches. Being a musician on a platform tends to feed all the wrong parts of our self worth. Are you willing to regularly serve in an area of your church that isn’t glamorous or visible? If not, it’s time to seriously reevaluate your motives as a worship leader.

Leadership: This really is the other side of the humility coin. From an outside perspective, there’s a lot of glamour in leading worship. You have a platform, and from it you get to be a “Cool Musician”™. By serving in other parts of the church, you have an amazing opportunity to practically demonstrate that less visible areas of service are just as valuable.

“But, if I don’t lead worship, there’s nobody else who can.” Sure, I get this is the reality of most small churches. However, leading worship for every service your church has is not healthy. You need breaks, you need perspective. Use this an an opportunity to train up another worship leader from your congregation or reach out to like-minded worship leaders in your community to arrange for coverage.

I know this makes a lot of us uncomfortable, but there’s no growth without discomfort. Put down your guitar, spend some time in prayer, and then work a vitally important part of your craft that is often completely ignored.

Tony has been involved in worship ministry for nearly 20 years. After graduating from the Calvary Chapel School of Worship, he spent ten years as a church staff media director. He currently works as a software developer in the healthcare industry and serves in various capacities at Calvary Chapel Milwaukee, WI.

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