Using a Cut Capo

I don’t think that I can express how much I love the Kyser Short-Cut capo. I love it too much, using it way more than probably should. I just adore the full, open-tuning tones you can get.

Here’s the theory: the short-cut gives your guitar the essence of an open tuning when placed on the second fret by fretting only the 2nd through 4th strings. The advantage if has over an open tuning is that you don’t have to learn any alternate fingerings; the chord shapes from the key of D translate. However, there’s some alternate open shapes I really like, and I’ll detail them below. Be aware, since the Short-Cut will be on the second fret, playing D shapes will translate to the key of E.

A few months ago, I was installing new WiFi access points in our church the day before I was scheduled for Sunday worship. While terminating the patch panel, I sliced my fretting hand open on my Electrical Shears. Due to the simplified chords available with the Short-Cut, I was able to get through set without much pain.

Here’s a chart of the open voicings I use a lot, they’re a great getting started point:

One final tip; if you need to transpose up from E, you can make use of a standard capo and then place the Short-Cut two frets up from the standard capo.

Have any questions or tips, hit me up in the comments or social media.

Disciple of Jesus. Former worship leader. Happy layperson. Software developer. Maker of music.

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